Close Reading Starter 1 – Link Question

Starter 1: Link

…So the student question must be addressed on its own merits, not thrown into a demagogic hotpot marked “immigration” (aka “bloody foreigners”). Obviously, hosting foreign students has a cost. Many do stay on, even now. And we have a lot of them. In 2008 Britain had the second largest cohort of foreign students of any OECD country. There are good reasons for this. We have the best universities in Europe, as well as some good further education institutions and language schools. We have historic worldwide connections. We speak English, the global language.

This brings a cost, but a larger benefit. In 2011/12 international students spent an estimated £10.2bn on tuition fees and living expenses. The gains in terms of human connections, ways of thinking, cultural affinities and international goodwill are incalculable. A study done last year for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills found that 84% of former students retained links with Britain and 90% had their perception of this country changed – for the better. Imagine if sometime Oxford students Bill Clinton, Benazir Bhutto, Aung San Suu Kyi and Manmohan Singh had all been thoroughly alienated by the kind of treatment that my foreign students are now routinely experiencing.

Q. Referring to specific words and/or phrases, Show how the sentence “This brings a cost, but a larger benefit.” acts as a link in the writer’s argument.(2 U)

***edit*** Answer to today’s starter

“This brings a cost” refers to the idea in the previous paragraph that there is an economic cost to having so many foreign students living in the UK (1)
“But a larger benefit” introduces the idea of the following paragraph which focuses on the cultural, economic and intellectual benefits of having foreign students staying on in the UK. (1)